The Workings

The Workings

Mill + Reservoir

Mill + Reservoir

 

A Worsbrough Mill was recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 and the first Curator, [Rob Shorland-Ball – 1975 to 1979] researched the history and states that a "tenuous but continuous documentary record can be traced from then to 1625 which is the likely date for the building of the existing Old Mill. Whether the pre-1625 mill(s) were on the same site is not known. However, a mill was a very important part of the feudal pattern of life and settlement and thus tended to remain on the same site if that site was a satisfactory one". The oldest building (the Old Mill) is a two-storey watermill with massive lintels over the doors; it is operational and mills a small amount of grain. The New Mill was originally steam-driven and contained a Watt-type beam engine which was scrapped in 1922. During the restoration of the Mill buildings in the 1960s and early 1970s a 1911 model Hornsby hot bulb oil engine originally from Sykehouse Windmill was installed by Geoff Hatfield (Millwright). The engine still functions, but is not linked to the millstones in the New Mill. The building is known to have been completed 1843 but was not present on a detailed map of 1840.

 

Trade for corn and flour began to drop off towards the end of the 19th century as cheap imported wheat came in from abroad. By the early 20th century Worsbrough’s New Mill became disused and the steam engine was scrapped. The old water mill continued to grind corn and oats for the local farmers to feed their animals well into the 1960’s. The water powered mill still produces flour in the traditional way. The white and wholemeal flours are traditionally stone-ground on a pair on 19th century French Burr stones, powered by a cast iron water wheel installed in 1865 between 11:00 and 14:30. There is a very pleasant Country Park surrounding the Georgian reservoir with peaceful, enchanting walks. There is partial wheelchair access to the museum. The Country Park has no steps but there are slight inclines and one narrow bridge but it is accessible to wheelchair users. The field study centre has four steps to the main door, ramp access is available through a door around the side. Assistance dogs are welcome.

 

Location : Worsbrough Mill, Worsbrough Bridge, Barnsley S70 5LJ

Transport: Barnsley (National Rail) then bus. Bus Routes : 7a, 66, 67, 67a, 265 and 482 stop nearby.

Opening Times : Weekends and Daily during School Holidays 10:00 - 16:00

Tickets : Free

Tel: 01226 774527