Lusitania

Lusitania

Titanic

Titanic

 

The museum is divided into a number of exhibitions. On the Waterfront: Liverpool’s docks transformed the fortunes of the city. Their story is a 300 year journey that turned a small, regional port into one of the world’s great maritime centres. Marking the 300th anniversary of Liverpool’s Old Dock - the world’s first commercial wet dock– this exhibition covers the period from the 18th century up to the present day. Personal stories show how the waterfront has changed and the impact it has had on the city and the lives of local people. In addition to stunning photographs of waterfront workers and buildings throughout Liverpool’s history, visitors can see the first known painting of Liverpool, the itinerary for Prince Albert’s visit to the city to christen the Albert Dock, a register of vessels showing the first ship using the new Albert Dock in 1846, and huge dock scales used to weigh cargo. The Titanic. This compelling exhibition explores Liverpool's central role in the Titanic story. Titanic, then the largest ship in the world, left Southampton for New York on Wednesday 10 April 1912. On board were 922 passengers, later rising to 1316 after calls at Cherbourg and Queenstown. With her crew of 892 she carried 2,208 people in all. Although she was little more than half full, her 20 lifeboats could only carry about half of the people on board. At 11.40pm on the night of Sunday 14 April she struck an iceberg to the south-east of Newfoundland, which fatally damaged the hull. The ship sank two hours and forty minutes later with the loss of more than 1,500 lives. Titanic was registered in Liverpool, and so carried the city’s name on her stern.

 

Lusitania: life, loss, legacy. This new exhibition marks the centenary year of the sinking of the Lusitania. Highlighting new research about the people involved in the Lusitania story, the display also considers the role of Liverpool’s liners in the First World War. The sinking of Lusitania was one of the most horrific incidents at sea during the First World War (1914-18). In early 1915 the German Government declared that all Allied ships would be in danger of attack in British waters. Lusitania sailed from New York on 1 May 1915 with 1962 people on board. On 7 May 1915 at 2.10pm, the liner was near Kinsale in southern Ireland when she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-20. She sank in under twenty minutes with the loss of 1191 lives. The sinking of this unarmed passenger ship caused international outrage. There were riots in Liverpool and London, as well as other cities around the world. The German government claimed that Lusitania was a legitimate target due to the war supplies she was carrying - as were many other British ships. However, British and American enquiries later declared the sinking to have been unlawful. This event devastated the tight-knit dockland communities in north Liverpool, where most of Lusitania's crew lived. 405 crew members died, including many Liverpool Irish seamen.

 

There are also a number of collecions. HMS Conway, a training ship moored in the Mersey for more than 80 years. The City of Benares, the tragic loss of the Children's Ship in the Second World War. The Battle of the Atlantic and Liverpool and the American Civil War. There is also the Edmund Gardner, the pilot cutter in dry dock next to the museum. Find out more about the dangerous world of smuggling and contraband goods. Whether they involve tracking down suspicious packages full of contraband goods, investigating the taxing world of tax or protecting endangered species, all of these events are based on the 'Seized! The Border and Customs uncovered' gallery.

 

Audio/Video with BSL on access. All sites have adapted toilet facilities, with the exception of the Piermaster's House. A Changing Places toilet is available on the second floor of the museum, adjacent to the 'Titanic and Liverpool: the untold story' gallery. Guide and hearing dogs welcome. Sound sticks (telephones) can assist people using hearing aids in most parts of the museum, except for some features of the Battle for the Atlantic gallery. Seating is available in the galleries. Table service is available in the ground floor café and the Maritime Dining Room on the top floor. If you would like to visit the museum and have specific access requirements for your group, please contact Joyce Parr joyce.parr@liverpoolmuseums.org.uk to discuss these. They offer tactile sessions for booked groups using our handling collections including All hands on deck and Customs contraband. There are two ramped accesses (gradients 1:12 and 1:15) and a lift to all floors. There is access to every floor but due to evacuation procedures they have to restrict the number of wheelchair users on each floor at any one time; as follows: Ground floor and 4th floor: 8 persons per floor. Basement and 1st to 3rd floors: 2 persons per floor. Quaysides (when open) are accessible to wheelchair users, although uneven. Unfortunately the museum ships, the Piermaster's House and some interactives in the Life at sea gallery on the first floor are inaccessible to wheelchair users. The International Slavery Museum is in the same building. The Beatles Story is close by. The Museum of Liverpool is close by. A wealth of choice.

 

Location : Merside Maritime Museum, Albert Dock, Liverpool Waterfront, Liverpool L3 4AQ

Transport: Lime Street (National Rail) 20 min. James Street (Wirral Line) 5 min. Bus routes C4 stops outside; 10, 10A, 10B, 12, 13, 18, 26, 27, 30, 30A, 52, 52A, 56, 75 and 76 stop nearby. Merseylink Service.

Opening Times: Daily 10:00 to 17:00

Tickets: Free

Tel: 0151 478 4499