Museum

Museum

Staircase

Staircase

 

The Museum displays are divided into four main themes: The Great Port, Global City, People’s Republic, and Wondrous Place, located in four large gallery spaces. On the ground floor, displays look at the city's urban and technological evolution, both local and national, including the Industrial Revolution and the changes in the British Empire, and how these changes have impacted the city's economic development. The upper floor looks at Liverpool's particular and strong identity through examining the social history of the city, from settlement in the area from Neolithic times to the present day, migration, and the various communities and cultures which contribute to the city's diversity. The Museum also features: Little Liverpool, a gallery for children under six; History Detectives, an interactive archaeology and history resource centre; a 180-seat theatre for community and audio-visual performances and meeting facilities. On 27 February 2007, steam locomotive Lion, star of the film The Titfield Thunderbolt, was moved by road from Manchester to Liverpool after being on loan to Manchester while the new museum was under construction. Some conservation work took place prior to it taking pride of place in the new museum.

 

King John's letters patent of 1207 announced the foundation of the borough of Liverpool, but by the middle of the 16th century the population was still only around 500. The original street plan of Liverpool is said to have been designed by King John near the same time it was granted a royal charter, making it a borough. The original seven streets were laid out in an H shape: Bank Street (now Water Street), Castle Street, Chapel Street, Dale Street, Juggler Street (now High Street), Moor Street (now Tithebarn Street) and Whiteacre Street (now Old Hall Street). In the 17th century there was slow progress in trade and population growth. Battles for the town were waged during the English Civil War, including an eighteen-day siege in 1644. In 1699 Liverpool was made a parish by Act of Parliament, that same year its first slave ship, Liverpool Merchant, set sail for Africa. As trade from the West Indies surpassed that of Ireland and Europe, and as the River Dee silted up, Liverpool began to grow. The first commercial wet dock was built in Liverpool in 1715. Substantial profits from the slave trade helped the town to prosper and rapidly grow,

 

By the start of the 19th century, a large volume of trade was passing through Liverpool, and the construction of major buildings reflected this wealth. In 1830, Liverpool and Manchester became the first cities to have an intercity rail link, through the Liverpool and Manchester Railway. The population continued to rise rapidly, especially during the 1840s when Irish migrants began arriving by the hundreds of thousands as a result of the Great Famine. Given the crucial place of both cotton and slavery in the city's economy, during the American Civil War Liverpool was, in the words of historian Sven Beckert, "the most pro-Confederate place in the world outside the Confederacy itself.For periods during the 19th century the wealth of Liverpool exceeded that of London itself, and Liverpool's Custom House was the single largest contributor to the British Exchequer. Liverpool's status can be judged from the fact that it was the only British city ever to have its own Whitehall office. In the early 19th century Liverpool played a major role in the Antarctic sealing industry, in recognition of which Liverpool Beach in the South Shetland Islands is named after the city. As early as 1851 the city was described as "the New York of Europe". During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Liverpool was drawing immigrants from across Europe. This is evident from the diverse array of religious buildings located across the city, many of which are still in use today.

 

Audio/Video with BSL on access. The main entrance is flat, there are automatic doors and there are lifts to all floors. Assistance dogs are welcome. Two wheelchairs are available to borrow, please ask at the welcome desk. A Braille guide is available from the welcome desk. Cloakroom lockers and keyrings are labelled in Braille. Accessible toilets are available on all floors. These are registered Changing Places toilets. British Sign Language interpretation and subtitles are available for most films. Tables and chairs in the café are free standing. If you would like to visit the museum and have specific access requirements for your group, please contact Joyce Parr joyce.parr@liverpoolmuseums.org.uk to discuss these.They produce large print versions of both of our what's on publications. The Family Guide describes our free family exhibitions, events and activities, while the Exhibitions and Events Guide has more on their wide-ranging temporary exhibitions, talks and workshops. The International Slavery Museum is close by. The Beatles Story is close by. The Merseyside Maritime Museum is close by. A wealth of choice.

 

Location : Liverpool Waterfront, Pier Head, Liverpool, Merseyside L3 1DG

Transport: Lime Street (National Rail) 20 min. James Street (Wirral Line) 3 min. Bus routes 14, 14A, 14B, 18 and 101 stop nearby. Merseylink Service.

Opening Times: Daily 10:00 to 17:00

Tickets: Free

Tel: 0151 478 4545