Edgware Road Platform

Edgware Road Platform

Edgware Road Entrance

Edgware Road Entrance

Edgware Road Platform

Edgware Road Platform

 

Edgware Road station was opened on 15 June 1907 by the Baker Street and Waterloo Railway (BS&WR, now the Bakerloo line) when it extended its line from the temporary northern terminus at Marylebone. In 1911, permission was received to construct a tightly-curved 890-metre (2,920 ft) long extension to Paddington which ended heading north-west under the mainline station. Work started in August 1911 and the extension opened in 1 December 1913. When the station opened, its narrow frontage was in a row of shops, but the buildings to the south of the station were demolished in the 1960s to enable the flyover to be built, leaving the station as one of two isolated buildings. Originally, an exit from the station was provided in the adjacent Bell Street. Although this is no longer used the building provides office accommodation for the station managers.

 

In common with other early stations of the lines owned by the Underground Electric Railways Company of London, the station was designed by architect Leslie Green with an ox-blood red glazed terracotta fa├žade. ATTENTION. Do not confuse this station with the nearby Edgware Road (same name) which serves the Circle and District Lines. In September 2007, there was a proposal by London Assembly member Murad Qureshi to rename this station Church Street Market, as this would end the confusion between this station and its namesake. The station is located on the north-east corner of the junction of Edgware Road, Harrow Road and Marylebone Road. It is adjacent to the Marylebone flyover. The station has cash machines, payphones, wi-fi and lifts.

 

Connections: London Buses routes 6, 16, 18, 98, 332 and 414 and night routes N16, N18 and N98 serve the station.