Maida Vale Platform

Maida Vale Platform

Maida Vale Entrance

Maida Vale Entrance

Maida Vale Platform

Maida Vale Platform

 

The name derives from the Hero of Maida inn which used to be on Edgware Road near the Regent's Canal. The pub was named after General Sir John Stuart who was made Count of Maida by King Ferdinand IV of Naples and Sicily after the victory at the Battle of Maida in 1806. Maida Vale opened on 6 June 1915 on the Bakerloo tube's extension from Paddington to Queen's Park 5 months after the extension. At the time, it was the first station to be entirely staffed by women. The women continued to work at the Maida Vale station until 1919 when servicemen returning from the war displaced them. The outbreak of World War II again opened up jobs for women. The southern part of Maida Vale at the junction of Paddington Basin with Regent's Canal, with many houseboats, is known as Little Venice.

 

The station is located at the junction of Randolph Avenue and Elgin Avenue and has a surface building designed by Underground Electric Railways Company of London's architect Stanley Heaps. He used a standardized design that appears in many station buildings under control of UERL whilst Maida Vale was provided with buildings in the style of the earlier Leslie Green stations but without the upper storey, which was no longer required for housing lift gear. It was one of the first London Underground stations built specifically to use escalators rather than lifts. In 2009 the station won a National Railway Heritage Award, in the London Regional category, for the successful modernisation of a historic station. The station has payphones, wi-fi and escalators.

 

Connections: Bus routes 16, 98 and 332, and Night Bus routes N16 and N98 serve Maida Vale road a short distance to the north-east.