Loughton Platforms

Loughton Central Platform

Loughton Entrance

Loughton Entrance

Loughton Platform

Loughton Platforms

 

The original station was opened by the Eastern Counties Railway on 22 August 1856 and formed the terminus of the branch from London. The actual location was on the site of what is now Cafe Rouge. It was re-sited some 500 yards to the south on 24 April 1865 as part of the extension of the line to Epping and Ongar. A new station was opened on 28 April 1940 in readiness for London Underground trains, which took over the service from British Railways (Eastern Region) on 21 November 1948. The earliest structure in Loughton is Loughton Camp, an Iron Age earth fort in Epping Forest dating from around 500 BC. Hidden by dense undergrowth for centuries it was rediscovered in 1872. The first references to the site of modern-day Loughton date from the Anglo-Saxon period when it was known as Lukintune ("the farm of Luhha"). The settlement remained a small village until the early 17th century when the high road was extended north through the forest. The road quickly became the main route from London to Cambridge and East Anglia, and Loughton grew into an important stop with coaching inns. The most significant of the great houses of this period, built as country retreats for wealthy City merchants and courtiers, was Loughton Hall, owned by Mary Tudor two months before she became Queen Mary of England in 1553.

 

The current station is of notable architectural importance and is a Grade II listed building. The ticket hall takes the form of a lofty arched hall, from which leads a subway that gives access to the two island platforms. The platforms are dominated by graceful, gull-winged shaped reinforced canopies that were altered during 1980s renovations. Although some original platform furniture has been lost the timber platform benches, with the London Underground roundel forming the seat backs, survive. The station has four platform faces and three tracks, with the middle bi-directional track usually used for terminating trains. A proportion of eastbound trains are scheduled to terminate at Loughton, most of which return to central London, although some go out of service into Loughton sidings. The staqtion has payphones, toilets, a waiting room and car park.

 

Connections: Local bus routes 20, 167, 397 and 549 serve Loughton from the bus station in the forecourt.