Roding Valley

Roding Valley

Roding Entrance

Roding Entrance

Roding Platform

Roding Platforms

 

The tracks through Roding Valley were opened on 1 May 1903 by the Great Eastern Railway (GER) on its Woodford to Ilford line (the Fairlop Loop). The station was not opened until 3 February 1936 by the London & North Eastern Railway (LNER, successor to the GER). The rather basic station buildings (all-wooden on the Woodford-bound side) were replaced by more substantial structures by 1949. Nearby is Roding Valley Meadows, a 56.5 hectare Local Nature Reserve. From the mid-1960s until the early 1990s the Woodford-Hainault section was largely operated separately from the rest of the Central line, using four-car (later three-car) trains of 1960 Stock.

 

It was originally named "Roding Valley Halt" (though while the full name appeared on tickets and timetables, the word "Halt" appeared on only some of the station signage), and was opened to serve new housing developments between Buckhurst Hill and Woodford. It was named after the River Roding which is close by, to the east. The track rises towards Chigwell and crosses the Roding over an impressive viaduct. It is normally quicker to travel to Woodford and change there, as trains to central London run frequently from that point. At the buildup to the peak periods, some trains starting from Hainault depot operate to central London via Grange Hill, Chigwell, Roding Valley and Woodford. Roding Valley is the most lightly used station on the Underground, and since 5 February 2006 this has been one of the small number of stations on the network to have no staffed ticket office, however staff are available 24 hours a day for customer information. It is also one of the twelve tube stations not to have ticket barriers. The station has boarding ramps and a bridge.

 

Connections: London Buses route 549 serves the station.