Ealing Broadway Platform

Ealing Broadway Platform

Ealing Broadway Entrance

Ealing Broadway Entrance

Ealing Broadway Platform

Ealing Broadway Platform

 

The Great Western Railway (GWR) opened its pioneering broad gauge tracks through Ealing Broadway between Paddington and Taplow on 6 April 1838, although Ealing Broadway station did not open until the following 1 December. As the only station in the area when it opened, it was initially named 'Ealing'. District Railway (DR, now the District Line) services commenced on 1 July 1879, when the DR opened a branch from Turnham Green on its Richmond line. The DR built its own three-platform station to the north of the GWR one, although, following the installation of a connection between the two railways to the east of the stations, DR trains also served the GWR station from 1 March 1883, on a short-lived service running to Windsor and Eton Central station, which was withdrawn as unremunerative on 30 September 1885. It was also intended to use the connection for a service to Uxbridge Vine Street station (via West Drayton), but this was never introduced. Following electrification of the main District line route through Ealing Common to South Harrow in 1903, the section to Ealing Broadway was electrified in 1905, and the first electric trains ran to Ealing Broadway on 1 July 1905. The original brick-built DR station was replaced with a stone-faced building sometime between 1907 and 1916.

 

The combined station has nine platforms:four National Rail (platforms 1 to 4). Trains do not stop at platforms 1 and 2, except during engineering works or other disruption. Platforms 1 and 3 are on lines leaving London, while 2 and 4 are on lines into London. Most of the National Rail platforms are open to the elements, although there are some waiting rooms on each platform. Two Central line (5 and 6), which have a shared awning canopy. Three District Line (7 to 9). District Line platforms 8 and 9 are partially covered by a short canopy, and retain a number of examples of early solid-disc Underground signs, used before Edward Johnston designed the familiar roundel in 1919. All platforms are accessed through a gateline of ticket barriers. The station has waiting rooms and wi-fi.

 

Connections: National Rail. Central Line. London Buses routes 65, 83, 112, 207, 226, 297, 427, 607, E1, E2, E7, E8, E9, E10 and E11 and night routes N7, N11 and N207 serve the station.