Willesden Green Platform

Willesden Green Platform

Willesden Green Entrance

Willesden Green Entrance

Willesden Green Platform

Willesden Green Platform

 

The station opened on 24 November 1879 on the Metropolitan Railway (later the Metropolitan line). From 1894 to 1938 it was known as Willesden Green and Cricklewood station. From 20 November 1939 it also served the Stanmore branch of the Bakerloo line, with Met services being withdrawn the following year. It transferred to the Jubilee line in 1979. The name derives from the Anglo-Saxon Willesdune, meaning the Hill of the Spring, and a settlement bearing this name dates back to 939 AD. The Domesday Book of 1086 records it as Wellesdone. However, on 19th century maps of the town such as those from the 'Ordnance Survey First Series', the town is shown as Wilsdon. The motto of Willesden Borough Council was Laborare est orare ("to labour is to pray"). From the 14th to 16th centuries, the town was a place of pilgrimage due to the presence of two ancient statues of the Virgin Mary at the Church of St Mary. One of these statues is thought to be a Black Madonna, which was insulted by the Lollards, taken to Thomas Cromwell's house and burnt in 1538 on a large bonfire of "notable images" including those of Walsingham, Worcester and Ipswich. NOTE: There was also a "holy well" which was thought to possess miraculous qualities, particularly for blindness and other eye disorders.

 

The station still has platforms on the Metropolitan line, but these are not in regular use and are only used when the Jubilee line is not serving the station due to planned engineering works or severe service disruption. The main station buildings, which date from the reconstruction of 1925, are fine examples of the work of Charles Walter Clark, the Metropolitan Railway's architect, who used this style of marble white faience for several 'central' area stations. The diamond-shaped clock is also a trademark of his style. The ticket hall interior, which retains much of the original green tesserae mosaic tiling, is a rare survival and was one of the reasons that led to the station being made a Grade II Listed Building in December 2006. Willesden Green is one of the few stations on the southern section of the former Metropolitan Mainline to still have its original platform buildings intact and its architecture is typical for a station serving a medium-sized town. The station has cash machines, Euro cash machines, a bridge, a waiting room and toilets.

 

Connections: London Buses routes 260, 266 and 460 serve the station.