Cambridge Heath Platform

Cambridge Heath Platform

Cambridge Heath Entrance

Cambridge Heath Entrance

Cambridge Heath Platform

Cambridge Heath Platform

 

Cambridge Heath station opened on the Great Eastern Railway’s new branch line to Enfield in 1872. Cambridge Heath has no connection with the university town; the Saxon who gave his name to the heath was probably called Centbeorht, which might as easily have been corrupted to Canterbury as Cambridge. The heath lay on a gravel plateau surrounded by marshland and was part of the ‘waste’ of Stepney manor in the Middle Ages. Apart from a house that was described as ‘ancient’ in 1275 there was very little here besides vegetable patches and hayfields until cottages began to appear in the mid-​​18th century. Later that century a more intense period of building began with terraced houses, factories and chapels. The locality was almost fully developed during the first half of the 19th century, although a windmill survived until at least 1836. Among the active builders here was the London Society for Promoting Christianity among the Jews, which built Palestine Place. Most of the residents were poor, especially in the streets around the railway line and the Regent’s Canal, and on Russia Lane. The philan­thropic Peabody Trust built its first Bethnal Green blocks here in 1910.

 

The typical off-peak service from the station is 4 trains per hour to London Liverpool Street southbound and 2 trains per hour to Enfield Town, as well as 2 trains per hour to Cheshunt. In the direction of peak travel there are additional trains giving 6 trains per hour. On Sundays, the station is served only by Enfield Town trains every 30 minutes each way. The station and all services that called here were previously operated by Abellio Greater Anglia as part of the Greater Anglia franchise. On 31 May 2015 they transferred to London Overground concession holder London Overground Rail Operations. Oyster card (pay as you go) was accepted at the station from 2 January 2008. The station is in Travel Card Zone 2. Although infused with a slight air of neglect, there is a warmth to the old brickwork. There is a shelter on platform 1 (towards Liverpool Street). The station has payphones and help points, but no toilets.

 

Connections: London Buses routes 26, 48, 55, 106, 254, 388 and D6 and night routes N26, N55 and N253 serve the station.