Camden Road Platform

Camden Road Platform

Camden Road Entrance

Camden Road Entrance

Camden Road Platform

Camden Road Platform

 

The station opened as "Camden Town" by the North London Railway on 8 December 1870, it was renamed "Camden Road" on 25 September 1950 to avoid confusion with the London Underground Northern line Camden Town which had opened in 1907. Thus, between 1907 and 1950, there were two stations called 'Camden Town'. The first Camden Road station was about 500 metres further east and was operated by the Midland Railway from 1868 until it was closed in 1916. Camden Town stands on land which was once the manor of Kentish Town. Sir Charles Pratt, 1st Earl of Camden (the tittle is styled after his estate, Camden Place, near Chiselhurst, Kent) a radical 18th century lawyer and politician, acquired the manor through marriage. In 1791, he started granting leases for houses to be built in the manor. In 1816, the Regent's Canal was built through the area. Up to at least the mid 20th century, Camden Town was considered an "unfashionable" locality. The Camden markets, which started in 1971 and have grown since then, attract many visitors all week.

 

The name Camden, which appears on the Ordnance Survey map of 1822, was later applied to the early 20th century Camden Town Group of artists and the London Borough of Camden, created in 1965. The original name ("Camden Town Station") still displayed on the parapet of the station building of what is now 'Camden Road' station. It is one of the few railway stations in England in which there is a police station. In addition to the frequent local passenger service, the station is a busy location for freight traffic due to its proximity to the junctions linking the North London Line to both the West Coast Main Line at Camden Junction (via the now closed station at Primrose Hill) and the East Coast Main Line at Copenhagen Junction. The former is particularly well used by container trains from the deep water port at Felixstowe to various terminals in the Midlands & North West of England; it also carried a passenger service (between Watford Junction and Broad Street/Liverpool Street) until 1992. The station is in Travelcard Zone 2 and has wi-fi, lifts, boarding ramps, cash machines but no toilets.

 

Connections: London Buses routes 29, 46, 253 and 274 and night routes N29, N253 and N279 serve the station.