Headstone Lane Platform

Headstone Lane Platform

Headstone Lane Entrance

Headstone Lane Entrance

Headstone Lane Platform

Headstone Lane Platform

 

Headstone Lane station opened in 1913, and was utilised by the Bakerloo line from 1917 to 1982. The land hereabouts was in the possession of Wulfred, Archbishop of Canterbury, in AD825. The settlement was called Hegeton in the early 14th century, probably ‘the farmstead enclosed by a hedge’. A moated manor house was built here in the 1310s and in 1397 the house became the principal Middlesex residence of the archbishops of Canterbury. A small barn may have been erected at the same time as the manor house, and was later rebuilt at least twice. A much larger tithe barn was added in 1506. The estate was confiscated by the Crown in 1546 – and then sold on to a court favourite within a week. Suburban devel­opment began to spread towards Headstone from Wealdstone in the 1880s, although a racecourse continued to operate here until 1899, when it was suppressed after a riot was “started by Londoners.” Hendon’s successor the London Borough of Harrow restored Headstone Manor’s great barn in 1973 and opened it as a heritage museum, with an especially strong collection of ceramics and glass. An 18th-​​century granary that originally stood at Pinner Park Farm was restored and relocated at Headstone Manor in 1991. The manor house itself, however, has now lain semi-​​derelict for three decades, although enough preser­vation work has been done to permit guided tours to be offered on summer weekends. In May 2013 Harrow council received an initial indication of financial support from the Heritage Lottery Fund that will enable all the buildings on the Headstone Manor site to be brought into use.

 

The typical off-peak service is three trains per hour to London Euston, and three trains to Watford Junction, calling at all stations. The trains to Watford Junction are northbound and are accessed through a gateway and by going down a flight of stairs, whereas the other platform is southbound and is directed towards London Euston. This is accessed by crossing over a bridge and also going down a flight of stairs to reach the platform. On the northbound platform, there is a gate exit which now has an Oyster reader, so passengers can exit through the gate without having to climb the stairs. There are also Oyster readers at the main entrance at the top of the bridge. During the Silverlink era, the gate was rarely opened - however in recent times, London Overground always leaves the gate open. Thus the Southbound platform (platform 1) is not wheelchair accessible. Since the recent take over of this station from Silverlink to London Overground the ticket office opening hours have significantly improved and two ticket machines have been installed which now can update Oystercards. Credit cards can now be accepted. The station is in Travel Card Zone 5. The station has wi-fi, boarding ramps, a waiting room, and a bridge but no toilets.

 

Connections: London Buses route H12, H14, H18 and H19 serve the station.