County Ground

3aaa County Ground

 

Cricket may not have reached Derbyshire until the 18th century. The earliest reference to cricket in the county is a match in September 1757 between Wirksworth and Sheffield Cricket Club at Brampton Moor, near Chesterfield. The formation of Derbyshire County Cricket Club took place on 4 November 1870 at a meeting in the Guildhall, Derby. The Earl of Chesterfield who had played for and against all England was the first President. When Chesterfield died the following year, William Jervis became president. Derbyshire's opening season was 1871 when the club played its initial major match versus Lancashire at Old Trafford Cricket Ground on 26 and 27 May 1871 and joined the (then unofficial) County Championship. Although the club had some good results in its early seasons, it struggled for the most part and before the 1888 season, following a run of disastrous results, Derbyshire was demoted from first-class status, which was then based on the number of matches against other teams of similar standing. Derbyshire recovered first-class status in 1894 and rejoined the County Championship in 1895. Although the county then had a quite strong team due to the bowling of George Davidson, Joseph Hulme and George Porter and the batting and wicketkeeping of William Storer, William Chatterton and Bagshaw, within three years they had hit rock-bottom, going through 1897 without a win. From this point up to 1925, Derbyshire were perennially among the weakest counties, losing every single match in 1920 despite the efforts of Sam Cadman and Arthur Morton, persevering professionals. From 1926, the nucleus of a good team emerged around some doughty batting from Denis Smith, Stan Worthington and George Pope. Pope's bowling and that of his brother Alf, leg spinner Tom Mitchell and seam bowler Bill Copson took the team to their one and so far only Championship victory in 1936

 

County Ground - Derby

 

The ground was first used by South Derbyshire Cricket Club in 1863 and was initially located within Derby Racecourse, although racing ceased after 1939. It also held the games of Derby County Football Club until their move to the Baseball Ground in 1895. The first FA Cup final outside London was held at the ground in 1886 when Blackburn Rovers beat West Bromwich Albion 2-0 in a replay. England played one football international here, beating Ireland 9-0 in the British Home Championship on 9 March 1895. The playing area used to feature pitches laid on an east-west axis. Most first-class grounds feature pitches laid north-south to avoid problems with the light from the setting sun. Derbyshire re-laid the pitch on a north-south axis over the 2009/10 winter at a cost of £100,000, ready for the 2010 season. This involved moving some of the floodlights and the electronic scoreboard to suit the new alignment. In early 2010 a large new 1,800 seat stand was erected at the North end (Racecourse) of the ground, which opened in May. A new marquee was also built next to the media centre which is used for private functions and entertainment during match days.

 

The Public Address system will give live scores and updates of key developments during the match. Guide dogs are permitted within the ground. Should your dog require water then the staff at any food service outlet will be willing to help. Should any assistance be required to reach your seat or any facility, please contact the nearest steward who will make arrangements to provide this. Visually impaired spectators at Derbyshire matches can listen to the match day commentary supplied by the BBC. There is disabled parking available and fully accessible toilets.

 

Location : The 3aaa County Ground, Nottingham Rd, Derby DE21 6DA

Transport: Derby (National Rail) 20 minute walk. Bus Routes: Trent Barton Rainbow 4, Indigo and Black Cat stop nearby.

Capacity : 9,500 (4,000 seated)

Opening Times: Daily 09:00 to 17:00

Tickets County/One Day : Adults £14.00;  Children £4.00

Tickets T20 Blast: Adults £16.00;  Children £4.00

Tel: 01332 388105

Queens Park Ground - Chesterfield

Queens Park Ground

Queens Park Ground

In 1886, the then Mayor of Chesterfield proposed that a public park be created to mark Queen Victoria's upcoming golden jubilee in 1887. However, it took the Local Government Board a further six years to agree on costs and the park was eventually opened to the public on 2 August 1893. Chesterfield Cricket Club was granted exclusive use of the ground in February 1894, and the first game was played there on 5 May 1894. There was an unusual incident during the County Championship match between Derbyshire and Yorkshire in mid-1946. After two overs were bowled in the Derbyshire first innings, Yorkshire captain Len Hutton asked for the length of the pitch to be measured. It was found to be 24 yards long, instead of the regulation 22 yards. The pitch was correctly reset, and the game continued. After a century of first-class cricket at Chesterfield between 1898 and 1998, the next seven seasons saw Derbyshire play no First Class or List A matches on the ground. However, following a multi-million pound refurbishment and upgrade of the entire park including the cricketing facilities, Derbyshire returned by taking on Worcestershire in a County Championship Division Two game between 26 and 29 July. The game ended in a draw, with Australian Marcus North avoiding defeat for the home side by scoring 161 runs, including 24 boundaries. Attendances for all four days was high, and saw Derbyshire announce a four-year deal to play County Cricket at the ground soon after the game. The Sunday then saw a visit from a star-studded Surrey Brown Caps side and despite a heavy loss, a large crowd were treated to some entertainment by Surrey batsman Ali Brown who scored 106 from just 68 deliveries

 

The Public Address system will give live scores and updates of key developments during the match. Guide dogs are permitted within the ground. Should your dog require water then the staff at any food service outlet will be willing to help. Should any assistance be required to reach your seat or any facility, please contact the nearest steward who will make arrangements to provide this. Visually impaired spectators at Derbyshire matches can listen to the match day commentary supplied by the BBC. There is disabled parking available and fully accessible toilets reserved for disabled use. Assistance dogs are welcome.

 

Location : off Boythorpe Road, Chesterfield, Derbyshire S40 2BF

Transport: Chesterfield (National Rail) 15 minute walk. Bus Routes: 2, 2A, 90A, X17 and X18 stop close by.

Capacity : 7,000

Opening Times: Daily 09:00 to 17:00

Tickets County/One Day : Adults £14.00;  Children £4.00

Tickets T20 Blast: Adults £16.00;  Children £4.00

Tel: 01246 345345