Stadium

Stadium

Aerial View

Aerial View

 

Formed in 1884 by a group of old boys of Wyggeston School as "Leicester Fosse" (because it played on a field by the Fosse Road), the club joined the Football Association in 1890. Before moving to Filbert Street in 1891, the club played at five different grounds, including Victoria Park south-east of the city centre and the Belgrave Road Cricket and Bicycle Grounds. The club also joined the Midland League in 1891, and were elected to Division Two of the Football League in 1894 after finishing second. Leicester's first ever Football League game was a 4–3 defeat at Grimsby Town, with a first League win the following week, against Rotherham United at Filbert Street. The same season also saw the club's largest win to date, a 13–0 victory over Notts Olympic in an FA Cup qualifying game. In 1907–08 the club finished as Second Division runners-up, gaining promotion to the First Division, the highest level of English football. However, the club were relegated after a single season which included the club's record defeat, a 12–0 loss against Nottingham Forest.

 

The club was re-elected to the Football League for the last time to date in 1915, when the League was suspended for four years due to a financial scandal and the First World War. Leicester were playing in a regional league organised for Midlands clubs in this period. Due to financial problems, Leicester Fosse had ceased to exist when the League resumed in 1919. The club was reformed as "Leicester City Football Club", particularly appropriate as the borough of Leicester had recently been given city status. As Filbert Street became increasingly outdated plans were unveiled on 2 November 2000 for a 32,000-seat stadium at nearby Freeman's Wharf, with 2003–04 being the expected completion date, although it was suggested at the time relocation could happen at the start of the 2002–03 season. Work on the stadium began in the summer of 2001, and by 10 October that year it was confirmed that the new stadium would be ready for the 2002–03 season. The stadium was completed on time in the summer of 2002, ready for Leicester to take up residence for the start of the 2002–03 season. However, it was not an easy start at their new stadium as they had just been relegated from the Premier League and were more than £30 million in debt. The stadium also has under-soil heating. It was known as the Walkers Stadium until 2011 when it became the King Power Stadium.

 

There is a Leicester City Disabled Supporters Association. There are Pitch level wheelchair spaces with carer's seated immediately behind in the West Stand (Block A2, B1, B2, B3, C1, C2) and East Stand (Block H, J1, J2, J3, L1 ) A limited number of wheelchair spaces also allow for a carer to sit alongside the wheelchair user, if this is a requirement. Upper platform wheelchair spaces with carer's seats behind in the Family Stand (Block P2), the Spion Kop (Block SK 4) and the East Stand (Block H & Block J3). Lower platform wheelchair with carer's seats behind in the Family Stand (Block P2), the Spion Kop (Block SK4) and the East Stand (Block L1). Designated seating for ambulant disabled supporters (Block SK 4, Block H and Block P 2). Reduced price season tickets + free companion tickets (subject to availability) are available to those who meet the standard disabled supporters criteria. Disability tickets are available to purchase in person at the City Fanstore or by contacting the Sales Centre on 0344 815 5000 or email disability@lcfc.co.uk . Through the Club's Disabled Supporters Association and Alan March, an audio descriptive service is available at King Power Stadium to supporters with visual impairments. The service, which is also used at Wembley Stadium, made its debut in the 2013/14 season, with Alan and his specially trained team providing blow-by-blow accounts of Leicester City's matches that differ from traditional radio broadcasts to bring supporters closer to the action. The service is free to use for visitors, who can listen to the action through headsets that can be collected from the matchday staff entrance. These can be collected from an hour and a half before kick off, and returned to the same point anytime from the 75th minute of the game.

 

All accessible toilets in the King Power Stadium are fitted with RADAR Locks. Supporters are advised to bring their own key. LCFC provides Wheelchair Accessible Coach Travel to most away matches, where required. Coaches are fully stewarded and have Hot and Cold drink refreshments and snacks available to purchase during the journey. LCFC have a dedicated team of Accessible Support Stewards to assist disabled supporters. The club hosts stadium tours. During each tour you will get the chance to see memorabilia from Leicester City’s illustrious history including former players’ international shirts, boots and programmes from FA Cup Finals featuring Leicester City. Alongside this, you’ll also get access to areas which are seldom seen by supporters, including: Executive Box, Media Suite,, TV Interview Area, TV Studio. You’ll also see inside the home changing rooms, before following in the footsteps of City stars by walking down the tunnel to go pitchside. Dates for remaining tours are : 5 March, 12 March , 26 March, 27 March , 9 April , 23 April, 30 April and 1 May.

 

Location : Filbert Way, Leicester, LE2 7FL

Transport: Leicester (National) 1.25 miles - buses available. Bus Routes: Arrivabus 84, 84A and 85, Centrebus 302, or First Bus 88

Capacity : 32,262.

Stadium Tours: 09:00, 11:00, 13:30 and 15:30.

Tickets Stadium Tour: Adults £10.00. Children £10.00

Tel: 0344 815 5000