Priory

Priory

Castle Gatehouse

Castle Gatehouse

 

Little is known of the early history of the site. Some Roman stones have been found there, but there is no definite evidence that it was occupied by the Romans. The Priory was founded early in the 7th century, perhaps by Edwin of Northumbria. In 651 Oswin, king of Deira was murdered by the soldiers of King Oswiu of Bernicia, and subsequently his body was brought to Tynemouth for burial. He became St Oswin and his burial place became a shrine visited by pilgrims. He was the first of the three kings buried at Tynemouth. In 792 Osred who had been king of Northumbria from 789 to 790 and then deposed, was murdered (dangerous time to be king). He also was buried at Tynemouth Priory. Osred was the second of the three kings buried at Tynemouth. The third king to be buried at Tynemouth was Malcolm III, king of Scotland, who was killed at the Battle of Alnwick in 1093. The king's body was sent north for reburial, in the reign of his son Alexander, at Dunfermline Abbey, or possibly Iona. In 800 the Danes plundered Tynemouth Priory, and afterwards the monks strengthened the fortifications sufficiently to prevent the Danes from succeeding when they attacked again in 832. However, in 865 the church and monastery were destroyed by the Danes. At the same time, the nuns of St Hilda, who had come there for safety, were massacred. The priory was again plundered by the Danes in 870. The priory was destroyed by the Danes in 875.

 

Earl Tostig made Tynemouth his fortress during the reign of Edward the Confessor. By that time, the priory had been abandoned and the burial place of St Oswin had been forgotten. According to legend, St Oswin appeared in a vision to Edmund, a novice, who was living there as a hermit. The saint showed Edmund where his body lay and so the tomb was re-discovered in 1065. Tostig was killed at the Battle of Stamford Bridge in 1066 and so was not able to re-found the monastery as he had intended. In 1074 Waltheof II, Earl of Northumbria, last of the Anglo-Saxon earls, granted the church to the monks of Jarrow together with the body of St Oswin (Oswine of Deira), which was transferred to that site for a while. In 1090 Robert de Mowbray, Earl of Northumberland decided to re-found Tynemouth Priory, but he was in dispute with William de St-Calais, the Bishop of Durham and so placed the priory under the jurisdiction of the priory of St Albans. Monks were sent from St Albans in 1090 to colonise the new monastery. However, when the abbot of St Albans visited in 1093, Prior Thurgot of Durham met him and prevented the usurpation of the rights of Durham. In 1095 Robert de Mowbray took refuge in Tynemouth Castle after rebelling against William II. William besieged the castle and captured it after two months. Mowbray escaped to Bamburgh Castle, but subsequently returned to Tynemouth. The castle was re-taken and Mowbray was dragged from there and imprisoned for life for treason. In 1110 a new church was completed on the site.

 

In 1296 the prior of Tynemouth was granted royal permission to surround the monastery with walls of stone, which he did. In 1390 a gatehouse and barbican were added on the landward side of the castle. Much remains of the priory structure as well as the castle gatehouse and walls which are 3200 feet (975 m) in length. (Although the promontory was originally completely enclosed by a curtain wall and towers, the north and east walls fell into the sea, and most of the south wall was demolished; the west wall and the gatehouse remain in good condition.) In 1312 King Edward II took refuge in Tynemouth Castle together with his favourite Piers Gaveston, before fleeing by sea to Scarborough Castle. These events were dramatised by Christopher Marlowe in his play Edward II, published in 1594. In 1538 the monastery of Tynemouth was disbanded by Robert Blakeney, the last prior of Tynemouth. The priory and its attached lands were taken over by King Henry VIII who granted them to Sir Thomas Hilton. The monastic buildings were dismantled leaving only the church and the Prior's house. The castle, however, remained in royal hands. New artillery fortifications were built from 1545 onwards, with the advice of Sir Richard Lee and the Italian military engineers Gian Tommaso Scala and Antonio da Bergamo. The medieval castle walls were updated with new gunports. In 1665 a lighthouse was erected on the headland (using stone taken from the priory), within the castle walls, as a guide to ships entering the River Tyne; it was rebuilt in 1775. (In earlier centuries a light had been maintained on the Priory tower for the benefit of mariners.) The lighthouse was initially coal-fired, but in 1802 an oil-fired argand light was installed; by 1871 it displayed a revolving red light. The interactive 'Life in the Stronghold' exhibition (located in the Warrant Officer's House) takes visitors on a journey from Tynemouth's beginnings as an Anglo-Saxon settlement, a medieval monastery and Tudor fortification, right up to its importance as a WWII coastal gun battery. To access disabled drivers' car park (10 cars), drive up causeway from Front Street, through castle gatehouse and turn right. Unisex and disabled toilets available. Baby changing facilities are also available. Dogs on leads allowed, assistance dogs are welcome. Wheelchair accessible apart from the gatehouse (steps inside).

 

Location : Pier Road, Tynemouth, Tyne and Wear NE30 4BZ

Transport: Tynemouth (Metro) 1/2 mile. Bus route Arriva Northumbria 306 stops here.

Opening Times: Daily 10:00 to 18:00. Oct. - Nov. until 16:00

Tickets: Adults £4.90. Concessions £4.40. Children (5 - 15) £2.90

Tel: 0191 257 1090