Italian Gardens

Italian Gardens

Courtyard

Courtyard

 

Probably originating circa 1300, the main phases of building appear to have been started by Sir Richard Edgcumbe from 1485–89 and followed by his son, Sir Piers Edgcumbe, from 1489-1520. This house is one of the least altered of the Tudor houses in the United Kingdom. The first chapel at Cotehele House dates from around 1411, but only parts of the north and south wall of the original building survive. Piers Edgcumbe inherited Cotehele House in 1489. He married Joan Durnford in 1493 and she died in 1521. He remarried in 1525. Two important altarpieces commemorate the union of Edgcumbe and Durnford, so it is likely that the building work on the chapel was carried out during the early years of their marriage from 1493 onward. The alcove that houses the clock was added into the west wall of the chapel. It is likely that the clock was installed at the chapel between 1493 and 1521, with more probability towards the earlier date. The clock is acknowledged to be the earliest turret clock in the United Kingdom still working in an unaltered state and in its original position. It has no face, but is attached to a bell which strikes the hour. Unlike its contemporaries, the Cotehele clock was never converted to pendulum, which makes it the oldest original verge escapement and foliot clock in the world. Other clocks with this claim, such as the Salisbury cathedral clock, were converted and later retrofitted with a verge & foliot.

 

There are 100's of personal family treasures and items loaned from the local community in the ‘On the Homefront’ First World War exhibition in the Breakfast Room. There is an extensive collection of 16th and 17th century armour much of which may be tried on during open days. The gardens are magnificent. The outbuildings include a stone dovecote in a remarkable state of preservation. The grounds stretch down to a quay on the River Tamar where there is an outpost of the National Maritime Museum (as well as a tea shop). Separate mobility parking and drop-off point. Adapted toilets close to car park. Two manual wheelchairs available for loan (no charge). A shuttle bus to take you around the estate in the main season (most days) The old house has many stairs. The hall, kitchen and breakfast room are wheelchair accessible. A hand-held DVD telling the story of Cotehele is available - ask a room guide. The room guides can identify suitable objects that can be touched. The grounds are made of loose gravel paths and uneven cobbles. A map is available in reception for wheelchair users showing you accessible routes in the garden.

 

Location : St Dominick, near Saltash, Cornwall, PL12 6TA

Transport: Calstock (Tamar Valley Line) beautiful 1.5 mile walk. Bus Routes : Plymouth Citybus 79 to the Quay

Opening Times : Daily 11:00 to 16:00; Gardens Dawn to Dusk.

Tickets : Adult £10.00; Child £5.00.

Tel: 01579 3513466