Gatehouse

Gatehouse

Long Gallery

Long Gallery

 

Lanhydrock (Cornish: Lannhedrek, meaning "church enclosure of St Hydrock") is a country estate and mansion in Cornwall. The great house stands in extensive grounds (360 hectares or 890 acres) above the River Fowey and it has been owned and managed by the National Trust since 1953. Much of the present house dates back to Victorian times but some sections date from the 1620s. It is a Grade I listed building and is set in gardens with formal areas. The hill behind the house is planted with a fine selection of shrubs and trees. Lanhydrock estate belonged to the Augustinian priory of St Petroc at Bodmin but the Dissolution of the Monasteries during the 1530s saw it pass into private hands. In 1620 wealthy merchant Sir Richard Robartes acquired the estate and began building Lanhydrock House, designed to a four-sided layout around a central courtyard and constructed of grey granite. Robartes died in 1624 but work on the building was continued by his son John Robartes, 1st Earl of Radnor, a notable public figure who served as Lord Privy Seal and Lord President of the Council.

 

During the 18th century the east wing of the house was demolished leaving the U-shaped plan seen today. In 1881 a major fire destroyed the south wing and caused extensive damage to the central section. Of the main house only the north wing, with its 29 m Long Gallery, and the front porch building survived intact, though the original gatehouse also dates back to the mid 17th century. New sections were built behind the south wing, including a kitchen block, in the style of the original building - which was unusual at the time. When Thomas Charles refashioned Lanhydrock after the fire he specified that he wanted 'an unpretentious family home'. While his idea of everyday comfort might be different from our own, there is no doubting the family is at the very heart of this house. There's a whole suite of rooms dedicated to the children, family photographs throughout and the morning room was even used by the children as a performance space for annual plays and theatricals. He filled Lanhydrock with the latest technology. Look out for state-of-the-art ovens and warming cupboards in the kitchen and dining areas, central heating systems and fire hydrants.

 

The Robartes family declined significantly during the First World War, including the heir Thomas Agar-Robartes MP, who was killed during the Battle of Loos in France, trying to rescue a colleague from no-man's land. Only one descendant survives, living in a cottage on the estate. Adapted toilets in car park and near house. There is Wheelchair access to building. The Gardens have uneven and loose gravel paths plus slopes. Map of accessible route available. Two single-seater PMVs available, booking is essential. Step to entrance of building. Alternative accessible entrance. Four wheelchairs available for loan. Ground floor has six steps down to the billiard room. Stairs to other floors, but lift available to first floor. First floor mostly level access, some steps, photo albums available to view. Shuttle service operates from main visitor car park to house.

 

Location : Bodmin, Cornwall, PL30 5AD

Transport: Bodmin Parkway (National Rail) then taxi. Bus Routes : 75 stops 1.25 miles away.

Opening Times : Daily 11:00 to 17:30.

Tickets : Adults £12.65;  Child £6.30

Tickets : Garden Only - Adults £7.70;  Child £3.85

Tel: 01208 265952