Perivale Platform

Perivale Platform

Perivale Entrance

Perivale Entrance

Perivale Platform

Perivale Platform

 

Before the residential building expansion of the 1930s, the fields of Perivale were used to grow hay for the working horses of Victorian London, a scene described in the ending of John Betjeman's poem 'Return to Ealing': "...And a gentle gale from Perivale/blows up the hayfield scent." The Great Western Railway opened "Perivale Halt" on 2 May 1904 but was closed when the current London Underground station was opened on 30 June 1947. It was designed in 1938 but completion was delayed by the Second World War. A planned tower and extended wing were never constructed, leaving the station smaller than intended. In July 2011 the station was one of 16 London Underground stations that were made a Grade II listed building.

 

Until the 18th century Perivale was called Little Greenford or Greenford Parva, to distinguish it from Great Greenford. The station is located on the Central line between Hanger Lane and Greenford stations, in Travelcard Zone 4. The station's fa├žade fronts onto Horsenden Lane South. Outside is a dry cleaner and a newsagent's kiosk, which is closed on Sundays and Mondays. Perivale has an island platform. The station has payphones, toilets, a waiting room and car park.

 

Connections: London Buses route 297 serve the station.