Queensway Entrance

Queensway Entrance

Queensway 1900

Queensway in 1900

Queensway Platform

Queensway Platform

 

It opened on 30 July 1900, as Queen's Road, and was renamed on 9 September 1946. The building is an unusual survivor of the buildings designed for the Central London Railway by Harry Bell Measures, with a flat roof so that commercial development could take place above - in this case, a hotel. Bayswater and Lancaster Gate were first developed as residential suburbs of London in the early nineteenth century. Bayswater Road, for eample, the road at the Baysswater southern end (Bayswater Road) was already a long-established route across the countryside, and a road roughly following the present Queensway can be seen on early maps running north from Bayswater Road across fields under the name of Black Lion Lane. It was subsequently renamed Queen's Road in honour of Queen Victoria, who had been born at nearby Kensington Palace: a name, however, which somewhat lacked distinctiveness, for this reason the present name of Queensway was eventually substituted.

 

The station was closed between 8 May 2005 and 14 June 2006 for modernisation works. These works were prompted by the need to replace the station's two (very old) lifts, which had been breaking down quite frequently prior to the station's closure. In addition the station has been modernised and re-tiled, as well as having replicas of the original lamps fitted to the fa├žade. During modernisation, the closest station was Bayswater on the Circle and District lines, which is also located in Queensway approximately 100 metres north of the Queensway station. While the two stations are in close proximity, they are not connected. There is a crossover east of the station to allow trains to terminate there. The crossover is hardly ever used. The station has lifts and wi-fi.

 

Connections: London Buses routes 70, 94, 148 and 390 serve the station.