Tottenham Ct Rd Platform

Tottenham Ct Rd Platform

Tottenham Ct Rd Gallery

Tottenham Ct Rd Gallery

Tottenham Ct Rd Entrance

Tottenham Ct Rd Entrance

 

The area through which the road is built is mentioned in the Domesday Book as belonging to the Dean and Chapter of St Paul's Cathedral. In the time of Henry III (1216–1272), a manor house slightly north-west of what is now the corner of Tottenham Court Road and Euston Road belonged to one William de Tottenhall. In about the 15th century, the area was known variously as Totten, Totham, or Totting Hall. After changing hands several times, the manor was leased for 99 years to Queen Elizabeth, when it came popularly to be called Tottenham Court. The station opened as part of the Central London Railway (CLR) on 30 July 1900. From that date until 24 September 1933, the next station eastbound on the Central line was the now-defunct British Museum; the next stop in that direction is now Holborn. The Charing Cross, Euston & Hampstead Railway (CCE&HR, now part of the Northern line) arrived here on 22 June 1907 but used the name Oxford Street until an interchange (linking the eastbound Central line with the southbound Northern line via the ends of the platform) was opened on 3 September 1908 from when the present name was used for both lines. The next station north on the Northern line was originally called Tottenham Court Road, but was renamed to Goodge Street at this time.

 

The station had four entrances to the sub-surface ticket hall from the north-east, south-west and north-west corners of the junction and from a subway beneath the Centre Point building which starts on Andrew Borde Street. The entrances were frequently congested leading to occasions during peak periods of the day when they were briefly closed to prevent overcrowding in the station. To eliminate this congestion, Transport for London is drastically reconstructing large parts of the station. This involves building a much larger ticket hall under the forecourt of Centre Point, new sets of escalators to reach the central section of the Northern line platforms from the ticket hall and step-free access to the platforms. From 5 January until 29 November 2015, the Central line platforms will be closed, meaning Central line trains will not be stopping at the station. On January 12, the new ticket hall opened for the first time. The western side of the original ticket office will be expanded to include escalators down to Crossrail. To enable this to happen the Astoria theatres have already been demolished and the original Central line entrance will eventually be demolished as well. The station has escalators and payphones.

 

Connections: Northern Line. London Buses routes 1, 7, 8, 10, 14, 19, 24, 25, 29, 38, 55, 73, 98, 134, 176 and 242 and night routes N1, N20, N5, N7, N8, N19, N20, N29, N35, N38, N41, N55, N68, N73, N98, N171, N207, N253 and N279 serve the station.