Sloane Square Platform

Sloane Square Platform

Sloane Square Entrance

Sloane Square Entrance

Sloane Square Platform

Sloane Square Platform

 

The station was opened on 24 December 1868 by the District Railway (DR, now the District line) when the company opened the first section of its line between South Kensington and Westminster stations. The construction of the station was complicated by the crossing of the site by the River Westbourne which ran through Hyde Park as the Serpentine Lake and was originally crossed by the Knight's Bridge at Knightsbridge. The River was carried above the platform in a large iron pipe suspended from girders. It remains in place today.

In the late 1930s, the station building was rebuilt in the modern style and escalators were installed between the ticket hall and the platforms. The new station building did not last long as it was mostly destroyed during World War II. A German bomb that fell in November 1940 killed 37 and injured 79 passengers on a train in the station and destroyed the ticket hall, escalators and the glazed roof over the tracks.

 

The station has ticket halls, 5 payphones (3 in the ticket halls, 2 on the platforms), two escalators (exit only), 7 gates, a Wifi service, 9 vending machines and two photo booths. It also has canopies over each platform. Note that access is via stairs. The entrance to the station is on the east side of Sloane Square (A3217). It is adjacent to the Royal Court Theatre and is the nearest station for Kings Road shopping, the Peter Jones department store and the Cadogan Hall. The glazed tiles are particularly attractive.

 

Connections: District Line. London Bus routes 11, 19, 22, 137, 211, 319, 360, 452 and C1, and night routes N11, N19, N22 and N137[16] serve the station.