Barons Court Platform

Barons Court Platform

Barons Court Entrance

Barons Court Entrance

Barons Court Platform

Barons Court Platform

 

The tracks through Barons Court were first opened on 9 September 1874 when the District Railway (DR, now the District line) opened an extension from Earl's Court to Hammersmith. When the line was constructed the area now known as Barons Court was open fields and market gardens to the west of the settlement of North End and there was no call for a station between West Kensington and Hammersmith. By the beginning of the 20th century; however, the area had been developed for housing and, on 9 October 1905, the District Railway (DR) opened the station to serve these new developments and in preparation for the opening of the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway (GNP&BR, now the Piccadilly line), then under construction. The GNP&BR began operations on 15 December 1906, running between Hammersmith and Finsbury Park. The name Barons Court is probably inspired by the Barenscourt estate in Ireland, where Sir William Palliser, who built the entire area, had connections. As well as Palliser Road itself, all the roads in the area are named after members of his family.

 

The station building was constructed to a design by Harry Ford in a style similar to that used at Earl's Court and Hammersmith and is now a Grade II listed building as it retains many of its original features, including terracotta facing and Art Nouveau lettering. The wooden benches on the platform with the station name along the back on enamelled metal panels are a unique feature on the entire London Underground. The station has two island platforms to provide an interchange between the two lines - the inner pair of tracks is used by the Piccadilly line and the outer tracks by the District line. The station has toilets and a bridge.

 

Connections: Picadilly Line. There are no TfL bus routes serving the station but there are Santander Cycles available.