Beckton Platform

Beckton Platform

Beckton Entrance

Beckton Entrance

Beckton Platform

Beckton Platform

 

Beckton is named after Simon Adams Beck, the governor of the Gas Light and Coke Company when work building Beckton Gas Works began in November 1868. Sewage treatment works were first established in 1864 as part of Joseph Bazalgette's scheme to remove sewage (and hence reduce disease) from London by creating two huge sewer pipes from the capital, one on each side of the Thames and known as the Southern and Northern Outfall Sewers. The Beckton sewage works, at the end of the northern outfall, is the fourth largest in the world and Europe's largest and is now managed by Thames Water. When the London Docks and Beckton Gasworks were active, they were served by a railway system. A separate station known as Beckton existed on this earlier network, several hundred yards east of Beckton DLR station, until its closure in December 1940.

 

During peak hours, trains from Beckton usually depart for Tower Gateway, although there are occasional departures to Bank. Off-peak, trains tend to alternate between Tower Gateway and Stratford International. The Beckton branch of the DLR is unusual, in that it has more frequent trains off-peak than it does during peak hours. This is because during peak hours, all trains coming from Stratford International go to Woolwich Arsenal instead. Like all open-air DLR stations, Beckton is unmanned and tickets are bought at the ticket machines. New machines were installed in January 2009 that now allow Oyster card users to top-up their pre-pay balance and see their journey history.

 

Connections: London Buses routes 101, 262, 366, 376, 474, 478 and night route N551 serve the station from Beckton bus station directley opposite.