Kingsbury Platform

Kingsbury Platform

Kingsbury Entrance

Kingsbury Entrance

Kingsbury Platform

Kingsbury Platform

 

It was opened on 10 December 1932 as part of the Stanmore branch of the Metropolitan Railway and served by that company's electric trains. After the formation of London Transport in 1933 this branch became part of the LU Metropolitan line and was later transferred to the Bakerloo line in 1939 then to the Jubilee line in 1979. The early English kings had parted with their manor of Kingsbury long before the Conquest. An estate called Tunworth, in the northern part of Kingsbury parish, was granted by Edwy to his thegn Lyfing in 957. By 1066 it probably formed part of the manor of Kingsbury, which was then held by Wlward White, a thegn of the Confessor. Kingsbury developed little in housing and population in the 19th century, remaining a polyfocal village. In this age, Oliver Goldsmith, writer and playwright, lived at Hyde Farm, Kingsbury (1771–1774); the third Lord Mansfield was buried at St. Andrew's churchyard in 1840. Between 1921 and 1931 Kingsbury's population increased by 796%. John Logie Baird's experimental television transmissions from the United Kingdom to Berlin, Germany were transmitted from the stable block of Kingsbury Manor, now the Veterans Club in Roe Green Park.

 

The design style is similar to that of other Metropolitan Railway buildings of the same period rather than to the concrete and glass style used at the same time by the LER group. In common with other nearby Metropolitan Railway stations (e.g. Harrow-on-the-Hill, Neasden, Queensbury) there is an element of fiction in the station name; the area is properly within the eastern extent of Kenton (Kingsbury Road at this point was originally part of the eastern end of Kenton Lane) and Kingsbury proper is actually closer to Neasden LU station. The station entrance is in a parade of shops on the south side of the A4006 Kingsbury Road, opposite Berkeley Road. Although now only served by deep-level tube trains, the section of line serving the station is built to surface gauge, and trains to that larger LU loading gauge occasionally pass through. The station has toilets, lifts, payphones, a waiting room and a bridge.

 

Connections: London Buses routes 79, 183, 204, 305 and 324, night route N98 and non-TFL route 644 serve the station.