Stratford Platform

Stratford Platform

Stratford Entrance

Stratford Entrance

Stratford Platform

Stratford Platform

 

Stratford station was opened on 20 June 1839 by the Eastern Counties Railway (ECR). The Northern and Eastern Railway opened a section of its authorised line from Broxbourne to join the ECR at Stratford on 15 September 1840. As well as a station, a railway works was built adjacent to the line to Broxbourne. This and the engine shed later expanded into the area to the west of the station which is now occupied by a shopping centre and Stratford International station. Services to Loughton commenced on 22 August 1856 and used the Lea Valley platforms, leaving the main line at Loughton Junction half a mile north of Stratford. Initially nine trains per day operated to Fenchurch Street (Bishopsgate on Sundays) on this route.

 

The name Stratford is first recorded in 1067 as Strætforda and means 'ford on a Roman road'. It is formed from Old English 'stræt' and 'ford'. An early industrial undertaking at Stratford was the Bow porcelain factory, which despite the name, was on the Essex side of the River Lea. Using a process that was patented in 1744, Edward Heylin and Thomas Frye operated a factory near Bow Bridge called "New Canton" to produce some of the first soft-paste porcelain to be made in the country. By the early 19th century, Stratford was an important transport hub, with omnibuses and coaches running into London four times every hour and coaches from East Anglia passing through hourly. The route into London was plied by Walter Hancock's steam coaches for a period during the 1830s.

 

Stratford Mezzanine

Stratford Mezzanine

The low-level station was substantially rebuilt in the late 1990s as part of the Jubilee Line Extension works, with a large new steel and glass building designed by Wilkinson Eyre that encloses much of the low-level station, and a new ticket hall. The old ticket hall, at the eastern end of the station and connected via a subway, has since been demolished. The Jubilee Line opened to passengers on 14 May 1999 as far as North Greenwich station, and to Green Park and Stanmore in November 1999. The low level platforms are at ground level and run north-south. Platforms 13 to 16 are served by a footbridge (with lifts and escalators) from the main station entrance, while platform 17 adjoins directly onto the main station concourse. Platforms 13 to 15 serve the Jubilee line when it was extended to Stratford in 1999. All three are bay platforms. A footbridge joins the platforms at the southern end, away from the main station building. Platforms 16 and 17 serve the DLR. The station has cash machines, Euro cash machines, lifts, toilets, boarding ramps, wi-fi, escalators and payphones.

 

Connections: Central Line, Greater Anglia, TfL Rail, c2c, DLR and London Overground. London Buses routes 25; 69, 86, 97, 104, 108, 158, 238 241, 257, 262, 276, 308, 339, 425, 473 and D8 serve the station with night routes N8, N86, N205.