Euston Square Platform

Euston Square Platform

Euston Square Entrance

Euston Square Entrance

Euston Square Platform

Euston Square Platform

 

The New Road was enabled by an act of Parliament passed in 1756. Construction began in May that year, and it was open to traffic by September. It was intended to provide a new drovers' road for herding sheep and cattle to Smithfield Market, and so it terminated at Islington at St John's Street. It also provided a quicker route for army units to reach the Essex coast when there was a threat of invasion, without passing through the Cities of London and Westminster, so it was London's first bypass. Building of the road was opposed by the Duke of Bedford as it cut off his estate in what is now Bloomsbury from the countryside. The Dukes of Grafton had become the main property owners in the area and, in 1857, the central section of the road, between Osnaburgh Street and Kings Cross, was renamed Euston Road after Euston Hall, their country house

 

The station opened in 1863 as "Gower Street", changing to its present name in 1909. In late 2006 the new entrance on the south side of Euston Road opened in a corner of the new headquarters of the Wellcome Trust replacing the old entrance. There is also a subway entrance on the north side of Euston Road. In December 2005 Network Rail announced plans to create a subway link between the station and Euston station as part of the re-development of Euston station. This will create a direct link for users of main line rail services which depart from Euston. These plans would also be pursued during a rebuilding for High Speed 2 (should that happen). It is the closest tube station for University College and University College Hospital. The station has lifts, cash machines, payphones and wi-fi.

 

Connections: National Rail (at Euston). Circle, Hammersmith & City Line. London Buses routes 10, 14, 18, 24, 27, 29, 30, 73, 88, 134, 205 and 390 and night routes N5, N18, N20, N29, N73, N205 and N279 serve the station.