Northwick Park Platform

Northwick Park Platform

Northwick Park Entrance

Northwick Park Entrance

Northwick Park Platform

Northwick Park Platform

 

The Metropolitan Railway's most important route became the line north into the Middlesex countryside, where it stimulated the development of new suburbs. Harrow was reached in 1880, and the line extended as far as Verney Junction in Buckinghamshire, more than 50 miles (80 kilometres) from Baker Street. Unlike other railways in the London area, the Met developed land for housing, thus benefitting from the increase in the value of its land caused by the building of the railway. After World War I it promoted its housing estates near the railway with the "Metro-land" brand. Northwick Park is a Metroland suburb. In 1905 Harrow school bought 192 acres of Sheepcote Farm to thwart plans for development near the school and the fields were converted into a golf course that opened two years later. The rest of the farm was laid out with streets by 1914 by the established owners of the land, the Churchill-​​Rushout family. Northwick Park was their estate in Worcestershire and several of the new roads were given the names of places in its vicinity.

 

It is served by 'slow' (all stations) trains only (fast and semi-fast trains do not stop at stations between Wembley Park and Harrow-on-the-Hill). It takes an average time of 20 minutes from Baker Street. It is close to Northwick Park Hospital, the Harrow campus of the University of Westminster, and the suburb of Kenton. Kenton station on the Bakerloo line and London Overground's Watford DC Line is within walking distance. It is an official out-of-station interchange between these two stations. The station has toilets, payphones, and a waiting room.

 

Connections: London Buses routes H9, H10, H18 and H19 serve the station.