Battersea Park Platform

Battersea Park Platform

Battersea Park Entrance

Battersea Park Entrance

Battersea Park Platform

Battersea Park Platform

 

The London Brighton and South Coast Railway opened a high-level line between Pouparts Junction and Battersea Pier Junction on 1 May 1867 as a means of reducing congestion at Stewarts Lane. York Road (Battersea) station opened at this time. The station was renamed Battersea Park and York Road 1 January 1877 and Battersea Park on 1 June 1885. The South London line through the station to London Bridge was electrified in 1907 and to Crystal Palace in 1910, on the LB&SCR 'Elevated Electric' overhead system. Prior to 1846 the area now covered by the park was known as Battersea fields, a popular spot for duelling. On 21 March 1829, the Duke of Wellington and the Earl of Winchilsea met on Battersea fields to settle a matter of honour. When it came time to fire, the Duke aimed his duelling pistol wide and Winchilsea fired his into the air. Winchilsea later wrote the Duke a groveling apology. Separated from the river by a narrow raised causeway, the fields consisted of low, fertile marshes intersected by streams and ditches with the chief crops being carrots, melons, lavender (all the way up to Lavender Hill) and the famous ‘Battersea Bunches’ of asparagus. Running along the riverside from the fields were industrial concerns and wharves, including a pottery, copper works, lime kiln, chemical works, and, increasingly, railways. The site of Battersea Power Station was partly occupied by the famously bawdy Red House Tavern, patronised by Charles Dickens. Access was via the rickety wooden Battersea Bridge or by ferry from the Chelsea bank.

 

The park was laid out by Sir James Pennethorne between 1846 and 1864, although the park which was opened in 1858 varied somewhat from Pennethorne's vision. The park’s success depended on the successful completion of the Chelsea Bridge, declared open in 1858 by Queen Victoria. In her honour, the road alongside the eastern edge of the Park was called Victoria Road, linked to Queens Road by Victoria Circus (now Queen's Circus). Prince of Wales Road (now Prince of Wales Drive) was laid out along the southern boundary and Albert Bridge Road constructed along the western side. The park hosted the first football game played under the rules of the recently formed Football Association on 9 January 1864. From the 1860s, the park was home to the leading amateur football team Wanderers F.C., winners of the first FA Cup, in 1872. One team they are known to have played at the park was Sheffield F.C., the world's oldest football team, in the 1860s. This is the nearest station for the Battersea Dogs and Cats home. The station has an attractive polychrome brick Venetian Gothic facade. It is a Grade 2 listed building. Access to the five platforms is via steep wooden staircases, are unusable by infirm or physically disabled passengers. Platform 1 is made completely from wood and ceased to be used from December 2012. Platform 1 has had its tracks removed and its future is uncertain. NOTE: Served by London Overground trains to Highbury & Islington at 0618 Mondays to Fridays (except public holidays) and to Clapham High Street at 2309 Mondays to Fridays (except public holidays). No step-free access to platforms from street , although step-free interchange is possible between platforms 2 (trains to Victoria from the South London Line) and 3 (to Clapham Junction). The station is in Travelcard Zone 2 and has payphones, boarding ramps, a waiting room, baby changing facilities, refreshment facilities and toilets.

 

Connections: National Rail. London Buses routes 44, 137, 156, 344 and 452 and night routes N44 and N137 serve the station.